Heading out on the North Coast 500

Looking for spectacular rugged landscapes and not afraid to escape to the true wilds of Scotland? Well, The North Coast 500 route (NC500) is perfect for you! This is a Scottish road trip to rival Route 66.

ore part of the NC500, or do the full loop around the very top of Scotland. And here lies some of the most beautiful coastal scenery, and spectacular cliffs, stacks, and seascapes. And you will find plenty of areas offering peace and solitude to gather your thoughts and absorb the beauty surrounding you.

But one of the most stunning locations is Duncansby Stacks and Duncansby Lighthouse, which lies near John o’ Groats on the North Coast 500 route. But, don’t try and do it all in a day, take an overnight stay in Wick. This will ensure that you have a wonderful trip to this area of Scotland known as Caithness. And where better to base yourself than the famous Mackay’s Hotel. A little gem of a find, set in a historic building by the Harbour, this hotel is famous for its great food and homely hospitality.

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The Iconic Duncansby Stacks

A sight to behold, these natural formations can be viewed from the rugged cliff tops or from the sea by boat...

Visit the Duncansby Stacks

Jutting out of the sea at the northeast tip of Scotland are the incredible Duncansby Stacks. A perfect place to take your drone, and a popular influencer selfie location, these magnificent sandstone stacks jut out of the wild seas of Caithness. Through thousands of years of rough seas and erosion, they have been separated from the mainland to form points of rock coming out from the water. If you look closely you will see that there are three stacks. Two are completely separated from the mainland. The third one is still attached and has a little archway that you can walk under. This is called Thirle Door. With erosion constantly eating at the rocks, one day the arch will no longer exist. Then, the third stack will be isolated in the sea too.

The stacks are handy for local wildlife, especially nesting seabirds. Grab your binoculars and watch them fly out to the sea to fish. If they are nesting you might even see them feed their baby chicks. Or get a little closer to the structures on rib boat ride and explore the history of the area by tour guide.

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Things to see on the NC500

Just along the coast from the Duncansby stacks is the famous Duncansby Lighthouse. It is well worth the 40-minute walk to explore. It was originally built in 1924 and in its time has seen plenty of drama, including being machine-gunned by a German bomber during World War 2. From here you can enjoy some more magnificent views out over the North Sea. Nearby the lighthouse is another geological formation called the Geo of Sclaites. This is like a slice of the earth has been taken out and in its place, hundreds of loud, squawking seabirds have been added!

Visit the Whaligoe Steps

But before this, on your way up to Wick and Caithness, you must visit the Whaligoe Steps! These flagstone steps lead down 250ft cliffs to the most extraordinary harbour in Scotland! And if you don’t fancy climbing the 330 steps, surrounded by cliffs, then explore this historical Scottish site by boat. But apart from these dramatic cliff steps, you will also find a remarkable harbour at their foot. And here was a base of successful fishing for herring, salmon, shellfish and whitefish boats. But the site was originally turned down as a “dreadful place!” by the famous engineer Thomas Telford. And as such, they were built later built at a cost of £8 by Captain David Brodie. As such, they became the successful home to some 20 fishing boats. Here fisherwomen would carry baskets of fish up the Whaligoe Steps, before walking all the way to Wick for sale.

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Getting there...

And where to stay in Caithness

North Coast 500 Castles

And if it’s Scottish castles you’re after. Be sure to visit the Castle of Old Wick when you arrive in Wick and Dunrobin Castle on your travels up the north coast.

Old Castle Wick

So, Old Wick Castle is one of Scotland’s oldest castles! And its ruins, perched on top of the cliffs of Wick are spectacular to this day! What’s more, the walk to the castle takes in epic sea views from the massive cliff tops. This Scottish Castle stood approximately 10 metres tall, with walls 2m thick. And with only a single window per floor, perched upon cliff tops, it was spectacularly protected from attack. But you must have a head for heights! This castle isn’t for the faint-hearted! As it’s protected on 3 sides by 30m sheer cliffs with only the crashing wild seas below.

Visiting Dunrobin Castle

Dunrobin Castle, on your way up to Wick and Caithness from Inverness, however, is still very much intact. And it is quite a spectacle to behold!

John O’Groats Brewery and Distillers

And if you need a tipple to revive you after all your exploring, John O’Groats (the most northerly tip of Scotland) is home to John O’ Groats brewery. So pop in for some craft beers and a tour. Or if you prefer a distillery then Dunnet Bay Distillers offer tours and shopping for their Scottish Gins and Vodkas. So pop in to sample some refreshing Rock Rose Gin and seasonal spirits.

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Exploring the North Coast 500

Where to stay in Wick

It sounds like this is all happening in the far reaches of an inaccessible landscape. In fact, getting to Duncansby Stacks is simple! That’s because you can follow the North Coast 500 route.  Whilst you can certainly do a day trip from Inverness to Duncansby Stacks, it might be more relaxing to stay overnight. A particularly welcoming place is Mackays Hotel in Wick. It is family-owned and often has deals if you can book in advance. As an added bonus, it is also situated on the world’s shortest street, as certified by the Guinness Book of World Records! Here you can relax after a day of exploring Duncansby, and have a lovely dinner in their No. 1 Bistro. Highly recommended.

There’s so much to see north of Inverness, and the North Coast 500 route is a great way to do it. It offers a whistlestop tour of the coast including sites like Duncansby Stacks and Lighthouse. And of course, if anything takes your fancy inland, there are plenty of other road trips and opportunities to explore the untamed Highlands of Scotland!

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Explore some of Telford's finest works of engineering

Thomas Telford was one of Scotland and Britain’s most celebrated engineers and was responsible for some of the finest bridges, harbours, tunnels and roads up and down the country. Held in such high regard, he was granted a burial at Westminster Abbey. However perhaps his greatest achievement, certainly in Scotland, was the planning and building of the Parliamentary roads and the Caledonian Canal.

In this post, you can travel along your own Thomas Telford Trail and admire some of the greatest engineering work the country has ever seen.

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Clachnaharry Locks

The Caledonian Canal is unlike any other canal boat experience in the UK

Beginning of the Caledonian Canal

Start your tour just north of Inverness where the Caledonian Canal begins. Here are Clachnaharry Locks, site of some ingenious thinking from Telford. How can boats safely enter the sea from a canal when the coast was just deep mud flats? The boats would sink quickly. So what they did was build out into the sea, piling up land and then cutting through the mud to extend the canal deeper into the water. Here, the boats could safely move away from the coast.

This was heavy, manual labour and you can still see how they did it today. Nearby is a plaque with a poem by Robert Southey, to his friend Thomas Telford about the opening of the Caledonian Canal in October 1822.

Top tip – whilst you’re here, keep an eye out for dolphins who like to come and visit these waters regularly!

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Invermoriston Bridge

Small in stature when compared to some of his other designs, nevertheless this bridge stands as one of Telford’s lasting memorials to his hard work. About half-way down the north-western side of Loch Ness sits the small village of Invermoriston and Telford’s bridge is just nearby. One of over a thousand bridges built to connect up the towns and villages of the Highlands, its humpbacked design has stood the test of time. There are two bridges here because time and vandalism have taken their toll on Telford’s original bridge. A new bridge was built in 1933. This one gives a great view of Telford’s original construction.

Top tip: This is a great spot to see salmon leaping! The end of October is the best time of year, and going early morning or early evening will increase your chances of spotting one.

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Loch Ness Roads Today

Most of the roads that today surround Loch Ness were down to the work of Thomas Telford

A82 Travel

Continue southwards past Loch Ness on the A82 and consider for a moment what you are driving on. This road was mostly planned by Telford. When he was young, there were no roads connecting up the Highlands like this. He changed how people could travel, and opened up much of northern Scotland to commerce and tourism.

Top tip: The A82 travels through to Drumnadrochit, the location of the Loch Ness Visitor Centre. This is worth a visit to find out more about the reclusive resident in Loch Ness!

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Caledonian Canal and Neptune’s Staircase

The Caledonian Canal took 12 years to build and was planned by Telford. It is a stunning feat of engineering even by today’s standards. if created today, would still beIt was originally planned as a safe route for the British Navy so they could avoid travelling around the dangerous waters of the Pentland Firth and Cape Wrath. Telford was given the charge to design and build it – and he did it with style!

The 22-mile canal has 29 locks and in 1873 Queen Victoria took a trip along it. People still flock to see it and enjoy time on a boat. It travels from Inverness on Scotland’s east coast to Fort William on the west. If you visit, make sure you head towards Neptune’s Staircase near Fort William. This is an astonishing feat of Telford’s engineering. It is a series of locks, raising the canal 19 metres over a quarter-mile. It’s a mesmerising sight to watch and takes a boat 90 minutes to traverse all the locks. It’s the longest staircase lock in Britain. You can find it at Banavie, near Fort William.

Top tip: Fort Augustus is at the south-westerly tip of Loch Ness and is the perfect place to watch canal boats enter and leave Loch Ness. Sit outside a local pub and enjoy the view!

So enjoy your first steps along a Thomas Telford trail, and admire amazing engineering examples. If you are looking for more examples of beautiful structures here near Inverness, then visit some of the beautiful castles in the area.

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Abandoned Pier

Inverfarigaig used to be a bustling industrial area with the pier providing access for materials and shipping of goods.

Inverfarigaig Pier

And now it’s time to drive along the beautiful south side of Loch Ness, past Cameron’s Tearoom. But if the temptation of delicious cake and patting Highland Cows is too much, you may need to stop! And then on to Foyers (but take in Loch Tarf, Suidhe Viewpoint, and Foyer Falls as you go). Finally, it’s time to drop down the steep hill, through the forests in search of Thomas Telford’s hidden Inverfarigaigpier. Yes, this hidden gem on Loch Ness is now served by a solitary single track and marked at the end by an old boat shed. But creep through the bushes and you will find a beautiful, secluded sanctuary upon this historic engineering feat. Beginning as a mass of rubble, extended in concrete, and in rubble contained in metal piles, the pier took shape being built in the early 19th century.

Find out the story of Thomas Telford's full life...

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East of Inverness History Trail

So, you want to see the best of our Scottish history and explore new places when visiting Inverness? Well, our East of Inverness History Trail is the ideal day trip for you. So make the most out of your visit to Inverness, Loch Ness, and the Highlands of Scotland with our planned day trips. Further, we’ve selected some of the best known, most beautiful, and historic locations to give you a sense of Scotland’s heritage.

You can travel to them all, starting at Culloden Battlefield and finishing at Brodie Castle. Or just select the highlights if you are short of time. Whatever you decide to do, you are sure to love the East of Inverness History Trail!

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Culloden Battlefield

Where the Jacobites rebellion met a bloody death...

Inverness History Tour of Culloden Battlefield

One of the most famous battlefields in the UK is in the Scottish Highlands at Culloden. It was here in 1746 that Charles Edward Stuart – better known as Bonnie Prince Charlie – was decisively beaten and his claim to the throne was over. Culloden was the last set-piece battle where both sides stood ready for each other on British soil. It only lasted an hour, but saw up to 2,000 of Charles’ troops die, compared to only around 300 of the government’s.

Today, a battlefield visitor centre presents the full history of events leading up to the battle and the aftermath which is still a topic of discussion today. Culloden has inspired many works of art, including the well-known Skye Boat song as Bonnie Prince Charlie fled ‘over the sea to Skye’. Viewers/readers of Outlander will be familiar with Culloden, and it also made an appearance in an early Patrick Troughton episode of Doctor Who.

Start your East of Inverness History Trail at Culloden. You can find it on a map here, and it’s what3words is having.restrict.rephrase

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Inverness Clava Cairns

Fancy touching a piece of Scotland’s history that dates back over 4,000 years? Then a visit to Clava Cairns is what you are looking for. This is a burial ground from the Bronze Age which has lasted remarkably well through time. The Prehistoric Burial Cairns of Bulnuaran of Clava (as they are officially known) was a significant site for millennia for rituals and burials in Scotland.

It is believed that many of the stones used to build the cairns were actually from an even earlier farming settlement in the area, further adding to the historic significance of this ancient place.

The cairns are only six miles east of Inverness, and 300 yards east of Culloden Battlefield. You can find them on a map here, and their what3words is abstracts.stirs.funny.

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A magnificent structure

Also known as the Clava Viaduct and the Nairn Viaduct

The Culloden Viaduct

So good they named it thrice! This stunning stone viaduct goes by three names depending on who you ask: Culloden, Clava, or Nairn Viaduct. But one thing everyone agrees about is that this is a breathtaking piece of engineering. Opened in 1898, it has 29 semicircular arches over the valley of the River Nairn. It is 1785 ft long and 132 ft high and will give you a sore neck if you stare up at it for too long!

The viaduct sits half a mile east of the Clava Cairns. You can view it on a map here, and it’s what3words is dreamer.forge.openly.

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Train rides over the viaduct

The most remarkable aspect of this viaduct is that it is still in regular use today. Check out this video of an LNER train driver’s point of view as he heads from Inverness to Edinburgh.

The viaduct sits half a mile east of the Clava Cairns. You can view it on a map here, and it’s what3words is dreamer.forge.openly.

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Fort George

Built as a result of the Jacobite rebellion

Fort George

Jutting out into the Moray Firth is Fort George, a magnificent artillery fortification – perhaps even the mightiest in all of Britain. The fort was built after Bonnie Prince Charles’ defeat at Culloden as a way for the King to stop any further Jacobite uprising. The fort was completed in 1769.

Although the barracks are still in use by the army (but will completely close by 2032), most of Fort George is fully open to all visitors. Some assistance for wheelchair users may be required at times. It is a fascinating example of how life in the army was hundreds of years ago. It lets you literally walk the same paths of soldiers of the past.

You can find Fort George on a map here, and its what3words is meaning.tributes.spurned.

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Dolphin Spotting

Whilst at Fort George, make sure to keep your eyes peeled on the water. This is a popular area for dolphins! Here and across the water at Channory Point are some of the best places to visit near Inverness to catch a really good sighting. Make sure you bring your camera as some of the dolphins like to play! Or you can book a boat trip on the Moray Firth to explore the sealife and spot dolphins with the experts at Dolphin Spirit!

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Cawdor Castle

Walk in the stunning gardens after a Scottish castle tour

Step back in time at Cawdor Castle

“All hail, Macbeth, hail to thee Thane of Cawdor.” And so with that line in Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Cawdor Castle was immortalised (even though never directly mentioned). With origins in the 15th century, the castle was home for hundreds of years to the Calder and then Campbell families.

It now sits as a five-star visitor attraction – even Robert Burns once paid a visit! It is open to the public between April and October when you can visit the gardens and go inside the castle. Of particular note to visit here is the ‘thorn tree’ which is underneath the castle. Its base dates from AD 1372.

The castle also offers plenty of woodlands to explore, and fishing opportunities too. You can find Cawdor Castle on a map here, and it’s what3words are zoom.flush.easygoing.

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Beautiful Nairn Beach

Ready for a break? Then Nairn Beach is the perfect place to take a coffee or picnic and relax. With wide expanses of sand and breathtaking views over the Moray Firth, the beach is the perfect place to stop awhile. There are parking facilities, toilets, and some nearby cafes. There’s even a play area for the kids, Nairn Beach is dog friendly too.

If you can come when the sun is due to set, there’s a good chance you’ll get a beautiful display. In the colder winter months, it’s also a good place to spy the Northern Lights, if you are lucky. Narin beach can be found on a map here, and what3words are folds.bond.releasing.

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Brodie Castle

Another wonderful castle in our area for you to explore...

Brodie Castle

Brodie Castle can trace its origins back to 1587. I was home to the Brodie family until the early 21st century. The castle is open to visitors and a particularly good time to go is in spring when daffodils carpet the gardens. There are hundreds of varieties on display, and make for a beautiful spring walk!

This is a family-friendly attraction too, with woodland walks and an area called The Playful Garden. The kids will love it! Brodie Castle is on the map here, and it’s what3words is strain.wiggling.retain.

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Enjoy east of Inverness

By heading east of Inverness, you are guaranteed to find beauty, history, and culture. Enjoy your adventures in this beautiful part of the Scottish Highlands! If the East of Inverness History Trail has whetted your appetite for adventure, check out some more road trips near Inverness. So, now to head back to the start with a bit more history and Culloden Battlefield – one of the most popular attractions in Inverness.

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2-3 Day Inverness to Skye Road Trip

This Inverness to Skye road trip takes around 3 hours each way to drive. Although this could be done in a day, we recommend the full two or three days to make the most of it. This is a very scenic trip, taking in many popular Highland sights and attractions.

Road trip details: Two or three day route, 113 miles, 6 hours driving time

Stops include: Glen Moriston, Glen Shiel, Loch Duich Viewpoint, Eilean Donan Castle, Sligachan. Portree, Old Man of Storr, Fairy Pools, Dunvegan Castle and Gardens.

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Explore the route map below for this road trip…

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Inverness to Glen Moriston

Wind beautiful roads over bridges and glens

The Route:

Inverness to Glen Moriston

1. Take the A82 from Inverness towards Fort William. You’ll drive down the north side of Loch Ness, passing through Drumnadrochit village, home of Nessie.

2. As you come to Invermoriston, take the A887 Skye Road. The road follows the Moriston river past Dundreggan Dam and reservoir and on to Glen Moriston. Drive carefully, as much of this route is single-track road.

3. Just past Dundreggan, you’ll see the Torgyle Bridge, a lovely bridge with three stone arches. You can park opposite to view it. Further along and back on the two-lane road, you’ll come to the grave of Roderick MacKenzie, marking the spot where a fugitive was killed by redcoat soldiers in 1746.

Glen Moriston to Dornie

4. From Glen Moriston, head east towards Glen Shiel. It is worth stopping at the watershed, the point where when the rivers and burns all run towards a common point, for great views.

5. You’ll soon come to a brown crossed swords sign, marking the site of the Battle of Glen Shiel in 1719, one of the lesser-known Jacobite Risings. You can stop here to view the information panels, which are set into a stone wall at the side of the glen.

6. As you continue along the road, you’ll see the Five Sisters of Kintail mountains on the right, and The Saddle mountain on the left. When you come to the junction, follow the Skye Road over the causeway and through Inverinate. You have now reached the west coast, as you drive along the shores of Loch Duich.

7. Just after Inverinate Service Station, you can go off the main road, following a sign for Loch Duich Viewpoint. This will take you onto an old part of the road and up to the viewpoint for amazing scenery. You will then rejoin the main road and continue on to the village of Dornie.

8. As you reach Dornie, you’ll see Eilean Donan Castle on your right, a 13th century castle, which was reconstructed in the early 20th century. You can stop here for a visit or simply to take in the views.

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Dornie to Skye

9. From Dornie, keep going along the road as you pass through Kyle of Lochalsh and then take the Skye Bridge. You are now on the island of Skye!

10. Follow the A87 towards Portree. You’ll pass through Broadford village and then Sligachan. The Sligachan Hotel is a good place to stop for refreshments and also great views of the Cuillin Hills.

11. When you reach Portree, Skye’s main town, you will find shops and places to eat and relax. Other recommended things to see and do on Skye include the Old Man of Storr, Fairy Pools, Stardust Boat Trips and Dunvegan Castle and Gardens. The Three Chimneys in Colbost is one of the most famous restaurants in Scotland. Book in advance if you’d like to enjoy some fine dining during your visit.

 

Skye to Inverness

12. You can head back to Inverness the same way that you came, allowing around three hours driving time.

We hope you enjoy this Inverness to Skye road trip. Find more road trip ideas here.

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Loch Ness Circuit Road Trip

This Loch Ness Circuit road trip takes one or two days to complete, starting and finishing in Inverness. Making a full loop around the whole of Loch Ness, we recommend the full two days to make the most of all there is to see and do. Don’t forget to keep an eye out for Nessie!

Road trip details: One to two-day route, 67 miles

Stops include: Jacobite Cruises, Loch Ness Centre & Exhibition, Nessieland, Urquhart Castle, Fort Augustus, Caledonian Canal, Falls of Foyers, Boleskine Graveyard, Dores beach.

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Explore the route map below for this road trip…

INVERNESS WEATHER

 Inverness to Drumnadrochit

Explore history and visit local attractions

The Route:

 Inverness to Drumnadrochit

1. Leaving Inverness, follow the A82 south. Just beyond Lochend, you will see Loch Ness come into view. There is a large lay-by here for your first stop, called the Wellington lay-by, after a World War II Wellington Bomber crash, which happened on the loch.

2. As you follow the road along, you’ll come to the Clansman Hotel in Brackla. This is the only hotel on the banks of Loch Ness. You can make a stop here for the local gift shop and café, or to join a scenic cruise on the loch with Jacobite Cruises.

3. Keep going towards the village of Drumnadrochit., home of the Loch Ness Monster! Here you can visit local attractions, the Loch Ness Centre & Exhibition and Nessieland. If you’re looking for a lunch stop, check out Fiddler’s Restaurant for great Scottish dishes.

Drumnadrochit to Fort Augustus

4. As you leave Drumnadrochit, you’ll pass Urquhart Castle. These ancient castle ruins date from the 13th century and are well worth a visit.

5. Next you’ll come to a small village called Invermoriston, where you can take a short walk to Invermoriston Falls and the historic Invermoriston Old Bridge, engineered by Thomas Telford.

6. Continue along the road to Fort Augustus, at the southern end of Loch Ness. This vibrant village on the Caledonian Canal is a must-see. With gift shops and plenty of places to eat and relax. You can walk along the canal and watch the boats pass through the locks. Take a walk along the waterfront for views of Fort Augustus Abbey. Or, enjoy a boat trip from Cruise Loch Ness. Book in advance to avoid disappointment.

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Fort Augustus to Foyers

Take in spectacular scenery and a magnificent waterfall

Fort Augustus to Foyers

7. From Fort Augustus, go back along the south side of Loch Ness on the B862. Drive carefully along the single track road. The scenery here is spectacular. You can stop at the highest point on the road, Suidhe Viewpoint, for the most breathtaking views.

8. Next you will come to Foyers, a small village famous for its magnificent waterfall, the Falls of Foyers. This is a nice place to stop for refreshments in the local cafes and a walk to the falls.

Foyers to Dores

9. Heading on from Foyers, you will pass the historic Boleskine Graveyard and the remains of Boleskine House, which was once owned by Victorian occultist Aleister Crowley and also rock star Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin.

10. Our final stop is Dores, great for beach walks and food at Dores Inn. This is also where the famous Nessie Hunter, Steve Feltham, can often be found.

Dores to Inverness

11. Continue heading north from here, back to Inverness and your Loch Ness circuit is complete!

We hope you enjoy this Loch Ness Circuit road trip. Find more road trip ideas here.

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Loch Ness and Glencoe Road Trip

This Loch Ness and Glencoe road trip takes one day to complete, with about 2 and a half hours of driving time. Starting in Inverness, it follows Loch Ness, through Glencoe and on to Fort William. With spectacular scenery and lots of opportunities to stop off along the way.

Road trip details: One-day route, 85 miles each way, 2.5 hours driving time

Stops include: Loch Ness, Urquhart Castle, Fort Augustus, the Caledonian Canal, Loch Oich, Commando Memorial, Well of the Seven Heads, Old Inverlochy Castle, Loch Leven, Glencoe.

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Explore the route map below for this road trip…

INVERNESS WEATHER

Inverness to Fort Augustus

A choice of routes with beautiful scenery

The Route:

Inverness to Fort Augustus

1. (option 1) From Inverness, take the A82 towards Fort Augustus and Fort William. This takes you along the main route on the north side of Loch Ness. This passes Urquhart Castle, the Loch Ness Exhibition Centre and Nessieland. (option 2) Alternatively, you may take B862 from Inverness. This way includes single the track roads, glens and forests along the south side of Loch Ness. Recommended stops at Urquhart Castle, Camerons Tea Room and the Falls of Foyers.

2. When you reach Fort Augustus, stop here to explore the village and see the historic Caledonian Canal.

Fort Augustus to Fort William

3. Next follow the A82 to Fort William. You will pass Loch Oich and the Well of the Seven Heads. Stop here to visit the monument and store, and learn the gory story behind its name.

4. Cross another swing bridge over the Caledonian Canal. Then drive along the south side of Loch Lochy. If the weather is good, the lochside is a great place for paddling and skipping stones.

5. After Loch Lochy, pass the Commando Memorial, then drive through Spean Bridge. There is a Woollen Mill and Café here if you’re looking for a stop.

6. Look out for a sign for Old Inverlochy Castle as you arrive into Fort William, after the Road to the Isles roundabout. This castle ruin is site of the first and second battles of Inverlochy and is free to visit.

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Fort William to Glencoe

Wind through stunning glens with spectacular scenery

Fort William to Glen Coe

7. Drive through Fort William on the lochside road, following the A82 signs. After passing Onich you will reach North Ballachulish. Take the A863 signed Kinlochleven. There are lots of places to stop along this quiet road, including Loch Leven Seafood Café with lovely loch and mountain views.

8. Now head towards Glencoe village. You will pass the Glen Coe Folk Museum. Then rejoin the A82 signed Crianlarich and head towards Glen Coe. You can stop at the foot of the glen to take in the scenery. Then drive right through Glen Coe. After the glen, the road climbs onto a moor. Just a few miles beyond, there is Glencoe Mountain Resort, with chair lift rides.

9. Now turn around and return back through the glen from the top. There is a stop on your left as you enter the gorge, where you’ll see a spectacular waterfall. Continue down the glen, driving carefully and stopping at the parking areas where for more great views and also some hikes, if you have hiking gear with you.

10. You’ll pass Glencoe Visitor Centre on your way back out of the glen, where you can learn more about this magnificent area.

Glencoe to Fort William

11. Now go back towards Fort William via Ballachulish. Before reaching the bridge, look out for a huge former slate quarry on your left.

12. Enjoy some time in Fort William. This pretty Scottish town has plenty of great attractions, activities, stunning scenery and places to eat.

Fort William to Fort Augustus

13. (option 1). Leaving Fort William, return home by the same route to Fort Augustus. (option 2) Alternatively, take the Road to the Isles and turn right at Neptune’s Staircase of lochs on the Caledonian Canal. Follow the back road to Gairlochy and the Commando Memorial.

Fort Augustus to Inverness

14. From Fort Augustus, return back to Inverness along the banks of Loch Ness. If you drove along the north side on the way out, drive back via the south side .. and vice versa.

We hope you enjoy this Loch Ness and Glencoe road trip. Find more road trip ideas here.

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